I got my 2nd COVID Vaccine Shot!

I got my second COVID Vaccine shot!  Yay!  I had to make a scrapbook page but couldn’t find a good virus picture so I made my own.  You can make one too!

If you get a vaccine or not is up to you.  I got mine and had to share.  This has been a rough year and I needed something to celebrate.  Thank you to the wonderful medical professional at the Henry County Health Department.

What You Need:
Paper Selection for the COVID Vaccine Scrapbook Page

The background page had to be fairly neutral but the page needed some patterns so I found this nice plaid.  None of the papers need to be 2 sided or any particular weight so have fun!

Cutting the Paper for the COVID Vaccine Scrapbook Page

A little bit of prep work is needed, like selecting your picture and if it isn’t in electronic form, either scan it or take a digital picture of it.  I did not put the picture in the download file because you will want your own.  Size it to a little bigger than 3.75 X 4.5. 

The electronic picture can be uploaded and saved as a Print/Cut image is Design Space.  If you need help with uploading pictures, I will add a section at the end of this tutorial on how to do that.  If you need to know how to do Print/Cut, there is a tutorial included in Design Space- There is Nothing to be scared of videos here.  While you are there check out my other beginner tutorials there.

You may want to cut extra Ys for the virus.  Just duplicate them and throw out any you don’t use.

Assembling the COVID Vaccine Scrapbook Page
The base page is not in the cut file.  Select something you like.  The letters are cut and layered by hand.  So are the frame and mask.  The two difficult images to put together are the virus and the needle.

The needle is assembled by gluing the green piece to the back of the dark blue needle and then layering the light blue on top of that.  The red flowers are glued at the center circle and then the petals are arranged to show through the holes.  When gluing it to the page, make sure the red petals are properly and then glue them down so that they stay.

To assemble the virus, start by placing the center 2 Ys then add the next 4 around them.  Then glue the rest of the Ys to the outside edge, making sure to space them evenly.  If you cut extra Ys,  you can add as many as you want but too many looks cluttered.

 

Uploading a Picture to Design Space

I included Cordelia’s picture in the Design Space file.  It is not in the SVG file.  Inkscape doesn’t work well transferring that many color layers into Design Space.  If you want to upload your own picture, that can easily be done.

First, start Cricut Design Space.  Then, start a new project.  Click the Upload button (the little cloud bottom left).  Then, click Upload Image in the center of the page and navigate to where your picture file is on your computer and select it.

Click Open.  If it is not an SVG image (most wont be) then click complex.  Remove anything that you don’t need.  Your picture, in this case. should be a rectangle and there wont be anything to remove.  Now, click continue.  Save the image as a print/cut image and it will be placed in the list of recent uploads.  Now open this project and click upload.  Select the image and insert it into your project.  Finally, size it appropriately for this project (a little bigger than 3 X 5).

Spanish Flu Similarities
  • At its worse, the Spanish flu infected 500 million people worldwide, which at the time was about a third of the Earth’s population.
  • The global fatality rate for COVID-19 as of April 1 is about 5%, although in the U.S. it is about 2.16%.
  • Another commonality between the Spanish flu’s H1N1 and the COVID-19 coronavirus is that both are considered “novel,” which is to say, they are so new nobody in either era had any immunity to them.
  • There were anti-maskers and conspiracy theorists that didn’t believe there was a pandemic  in 1918 too.
  • Vaccines didn’t exist in 1918.
I got my 2nd COVID Vaccine Shot!

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